4 films to see on the week of March 24-31, 2017

Power Rangers

Power Rangers

BASED on the popular children’s show, Power Rangers follows five high school kids with different personalities who are infused with unique superpowers and must work as a team to save the world. Directed by Dean Israelite, it stars Becky G, Dacre Montgomery, Ludi Lin, Naomi Scott, and RJ Cyler. Critics are divided. Alonso Duralde of TheWrap writes: “It packs enough zing to make you forgive the origin-story clichés. And the predictable save-the-world stuff. And the insanely ubiquitous product placement. (Whatever Krispy Kreme paid to be a plot point in this movie, they got their money’s worth.) Variety’s Owen Gleiberman’ take: “The characters in Power Rangers have all the depth and idiosyncrasy of walking talking robo-teen action figures.”
MTRCB Rating: PG

CHiPs

CHiPs

BASED on the popular 1970s TV show, CHiPs revolves around Jon and Ponch, two California Highway Patrol motorcycle officers — a rookie teamed with a hardened pro. The newbie soon learns his partner is really an undercover Fed investigating a heist that may involved some crooked cops. Written and directed by Dax Shepard who also stars alongside Michael Peña, Jessica McNamee, Kristen Bell, Vincent D’Onofrio, Maya Rudolph, and Adam Brody.
MTRCB Rating: R-16

The Last Word

The Last Word

SHIRLEY MACLAINE is a once successful businesswoman who tightly controls every aspect of her life — including her obituary, hiring a young local writer played by Amanda Seyfried for the job. Directed by Mark Pellington. Julia Cooper of the Globe and Mail writes: “I hope that in the name of her decades-spanning career and six Academy Award nominations (plus one win), we might do MacLaine the small courtesy of forgetting that this pedestrian and dull comedy ever happened.”
MTRCB Rating: R-13

Journey to the West: Demon Chapter
(aka Journey to the West: The Demons Strike Back)

Journey to the West: Demon Chapter

A HISTORICAL fantasy epic, the movie follows a monk and his disciples who travel to the West to exorcise demonic possessions. Tsui Hark directs. “If anything, Demons Strike Back is an even zanier and more kid-friendly affair than the Chow original,” writes the AV Club’s Jesse Hassenger, “Yet without Chow’s unique strain of silliness, it also feels louder and more antic while covering less ground.” RogerEbert.com’s Scout Tafoya calls it “A madcap success on its own bizarre terms and an informative distillation of each auteur’s sensibility.”
MTRCB Rating: PG