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DoE sets virtual hearing on energy-efficiency label rules

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RETAILERS selling ECPs must have energy labels attached to the products which are visible to buyers. — FREEPIK

THE Department of Energy (DoE) has scheduled another video consultation on draft rules that will govern the labeling of energy-consuming products (ECPs) alerting consumers to their energy use.

Among the ECPs covered by the rules are air conditioners, refrigerators, freezers, televisions, and lighting products.

In an advisory posted on its website Monday, the DoE said the hearing will take place via Microsoft Teams on Feb. 26 at 10 a.m.

The Philippine Energy Labeling Program (PELP) guidelines, drafted by the Energy Utilization Management Bureau (EUMB), aim to encourage the use of energy-efficient products.

“Since its first public consultation, the DoE has been continuously receiving valuable input and recommendations from our stakeholders, including input from World Trade Organization (WTO) member countries. As such, the PELP implementing guidelines were further refined and updated to incorporate the feedback received,” the EUMB said.

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In June, the DoE released a department circular detailing the PELP guidelines, directing manufacturers, distributors and dealers to include energy labels on electrical appliances.

“Additional ECPs shall be included within the coverage of the PELP upon recommendation of EUMB. (The) recommendation shall be made after public consultation and coordination with (the) Department of Environment and Natural Resources and Department of Transportation for fuel economy performance labeling requirements for transport,” the circular stated.

The circular added that retailers selling ECPs must have energy labels attached to the products which are visible to buyers.

“As applicable, they shall also exhibit the energy labels in all their publications including the advertisement in newspapers, TVs or leaflets and in all online trading activities. At the minimum, the energy efficiency class of the product, as applicable, needs to be mentioned,” the DoE said. — Angelica Y. Yang

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