Corporate News



By Krista A. M. Montealegre, Senior Reporter


IMI opens facility for power modules




Posted on December 18, 2015


INTEGRATED Micro-Electronics, Inc. (IMI) has inaugurated a facility that will allow the Ayala-led firm to serve the rising demand for power modules -- a key driver of growth in the semiconductor market.

The new facility produces and develops Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules, which are terminal power semiconductor devices used as electronic switches that combine high efficiency and fast switching, IMI said in a statement.

They are used on trains, refrigerators, lamp ballasts, air-conditioners, solar applications, motion devices and anything that needs electric switching and requires power efficiency.

“The power module business is very much aligned with IMI’s strategy of offering innovative solutions which will impact our top and bottom lines. Further, it is in line with the expanding business in our target markets of automotive and industrial segments,” IMI President and Chief Executive Officer Arthur Tan was quoted in the statement as saying.



IMI is one of the few companies in the world capable of handling not only the electronics manufacturing side of the power modules but also the power semiconductor side of the business, Mr. Tan said.

Power modules are seen accounting for 30% of the total power of semiconductor market by 2019, IMI said, citing research by IHS, Inc.

Demand for modular power solutions from original equipment manufacturers is on the rise because of their higher power density and reliability, IMI said.

The company refurbished a surface mount technology assembly facility in Laguna Technopark into a power module facility, IMI Strategic Planning and Marketing Manager Frederick L. Blancas said in a mobile phone message.

IMI reported a 5% year-on-year jump in nine-month profit to $22 million despite a global economic slowdown and electronics industry downturn that pulled down consolidated revenues by 4% to $621.5 million.

Shares in IMI added four centavos or 0.69% to close at P5.80 each on Thursday.